Books

What I Read Last Week

What I Read Last Week

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I’ve worked myself to the bone that past month. Which means that the Man Booker reading list I started on so ambitiously three months ago has sputtered to a halt for now. I had started on The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota, but my mind was too dulled down to process it satisfactorily.

Instead, I randomly picked up two review books that had come in.

The Night Circus

The Night Circus

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This book has sat on my bookshelf for years. I bought it when it first came out (about five years ago?). I was charmed by the beautiful cover and the blurb, but then a reviewer whose opinions I trust was quite scathing about the book, so I left it unread all these years, until I stumbled across it while cleaning out my shelves recently. I skimmed through the first couple of pages and thought I’d give this book a try.

Anywhere but Home

Anywhere but Home

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This book is a memoir about an Indian woman’s attempt at completing the Ultraman.

If you’re not quite sure what is an Ultraman, here are the deets.

All the Light we Cannot see

All the Light we Cannot see

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I never wanted to read this book for the longest time. From all the descriptions and reviews I read online, it seemed like another The Book Thief – a book I loved, but I didn’t particularly want to read another book about children in World War 2.

I eventually caved in and got this book because all the reviews were just too glowing to ignore any longer.

Teacher’s Day – Inspiration through Books, TV, and Movies

Teacher’s Day – Inspiration through Books, TV, and Movies

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Every year sometime late in August, Snubnose comes to me for help on some project or the other – to make a little something special for her teacher. This year for the first time, she’s going all independent on a project of her own. The ever independent Piglet also scorned my help – scribbling out a drawing of an elephant (or was it a dinosaur for his teacher)?

Anyway, with nobody needing my help, the time hangs heavy on my hands. And hence this blog post where I list the top teacher’s pets, and teachers on books, movies, and TV.

Bring up the Bodies

Bring up the Bodies

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I am on a roll right here. Two Man Booker prize-winning novels in a row. That usually never happens. Usually award winning books are such powerful experiences, that I need to take a break to clean up my mind a bit.

But Bring up the Bodies hardly feels like a Booker prize winner. It’s fast-paced, taut, and has a very tense quality in it, which is very surprising for a historical novel.

And yes, the language is out of the mind beautiful. But Mantel is not an author in love with her writing. At no point does the wonderful writing overshadow the story.

And what a story it is!