All posts tagged: Michael Connelly

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Top Ten Tuesdays: Top Recent Reads

Today, the bloggers at The Broke and the Bookish have asked us to list our recent 5-star reads. Since I rarely classify books as 5-stars, let’s face it, no book is perfect, I am instead going to list the top ten books I read and loved recently. Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson – This book was sitting on my shelf for ages. I don’t know why I never picked it up before (probably the gloomy cover did not attract me), but once I started reading it, I loved this slow, melancholic tale about life and racism in a small town in America. Here’s a teaser from the book. The Martian by Andy Weir – Loved the humor in this book. A funny read was not what I was expecting when I picked this book up, but the self-deprecating humor in this book totally slayed me. City of Bones by Cassandra Clare – Fun YA Fantasy novel, a little predictable but I loved some of the main characters (read heroes), and I look forward …

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Binge-reading Michael Connelly

When work is hectic, and the personal life even more so, rereads and easy thrillers are the order of the day. Michael Connelly has always been one of my fallback authors during such times and hence these two books. Blood Work Blood Work is practically a vintage read. This is the first in Connelly’s Terry McCaleb crime series, and is set, I gather in the late 90s (mainly due to the unavailability of cell phones in the novel). Synopsis When Graciella Rivers steps onto his boat, ex-FBI agent Terrell McCaleb has no idea he’s about to come out of retirement. He’s recuperating from a heart transplant and avoiding anything stressful. But when Graciella tells him the way her sister Gloria was murdered, it leaves Terry no choice. Now the man with the new heart vows to take down a predator without a soul. ~ Synopsis from Goodreads This book started strongly with an interesting premise, and maintains the tension and the thrills till about three-quarters into the novel. And even after the reveal, the book …

My First Tag of 2010

My reading efforts and my life in general has been pretty lacklustre of late. Nothing eventful to blog about. Couple of weeks back, the snubnose was down with pneumonia. In the ensuing worry, leave from office, and so on, I have had to do some massive catch-up with work, and it is not over yet. I have also had to slow down completely halt my reading of Bleak House. I stopped reading when the snubnose fell ill, and I have just not been motivated enough to pick it up (or even any other book) again. Strange for me! I must really be feeling the blues… Anyway, I saw this interesting meme on Mae’s blog, and I liked the questions enough to take part myself. So, without much ado, here we go: Favorite childhood book? If it was early childhood, I would agree with Mae and list The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton. By the time I was ten though, I was headlong in love with Robert Louis Stevenson … in particular Treasure Island and Black Arrow. …

The Black Ice by Michael Connelly

The Black Ice – A Book Review

I hope I am not boring all you folks with my obsession with Michael Connelly. I do read other authors, I swear! In fact, I think I am boring myself as well with my reading choices. To shake things up a bit and break the monotony, I loaded myself with classics from the library last week. Yes, heavy duty ones, and I am now just hoping that I will have the time to really do justice to these massive tomes I have so ambitiously checked out. Anyway on to this review. What is The Black Ice all About: This book is the second one in the Harry Bosch series. And from the start of the book, it is very obvious that the writer is just feeling his way through the character of Harry Bosch and the direction this series is going to take. There is nothing specific I can point out. However, a certain self-assuredness and confidence is lacking in the writing. The book rambles where it should not ramble and tightens up when the …

The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly

The Lincoln Lawyer – A Book Review

Mickey Haller is The Lincoln Lawyer, a Los Angeles defense attorney who does most of his work out of the back of his chauffeured Lincoln Town Car. Mickey approaches his job knowing that the law has nothing to do with truth and justice or guilt and innocence. Instead it’s a system to be worked to find a way to get his clients off and make a nice payday in the process. It didn’t matter…whether the defendant ‘did it’ or not. What mattered was the evidence against him–the proof–and if and how it could be neutralized. My job was to bury the proof, to color the proof a shade of gray. Gray was the color of reasonable doubt. When he’s hired to defend a spoiled playboy against a charge of attempted murder of an escort, Mickey takes it knowing the rich kid will pay handsomely. As he investigates the case, it appears that his rich client could be one of those rare cases – that of an innocent man, or he could be evil personified. Which …

The Poet

The Poet

This is the year of thrillers, it seems. Last year, I read lots of young adult and fantasy, but this is the year of thrillers, and here is one more that I am reviewing for you guys. I spent last night wide awake compulsively turning the last 100 odd pages of The Poet by Michael Connelly, and I can’t say enough good things about how well the book made that lack of sleep all worthwhile. The book starts off with the following sentence: Death is my beat. I forge my professional reputation from it. I treat it with the passion and precision of an undertaker – somber and sympathetic about it when I am with bereaved, a skilled craftsman with it when I’m alone. I’ve always thought the secret of death was to keep it at arm’s length. That’s the rule. Don’t let it breathe in your face. The above sentence is how professional crime reporter Jake McEvoy introduces himself and his profession – a crime reporter. He finds himself at odds with the above …

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The Pleasures of Rereading

So, I have been a bit distracted from blogging this past week or so. The times, they have been busy! At such times when I am swamped with work and totally stressed to boot, I would love to unwind with a good book. However, I rarely am able to focus and pay attention to books; let alone be able to blog about them afterward. At these times, rereads come in useful. I just pick up something that I remember knowing and liking, but without actually remembering the plot in detail. I am particularly fond of thrillers/science fiction, because these were books that I devoured when I was in school and college. And unfortunately, I rarely find good books in either genre these days. Last week, I picked up these books from Eloor Library. The Concrete Blonde by Michael Connelly is one in a series of books featuring Harry Bosch – a detective working in the LAPD. His personal motto is: Everybody counts or nobody counts. His most defining character trait, it describes his motivation to …

The Good Guy

The Good Guy

Always on the prowl for a good suspense thriller writer ala John Sandford or Michael Connelly, I stumbled onto Dean Koontz, and took a chance on “The Good Guy”. Dean Koontz is not a new author, he has been writing consistently since the late 1970s. It is just that I have not really registered him on my radar much. When I picked up this book, it was in the hope that it would introduce me to a whole new series of great thrillers. Well, “The Good Guy” is a decent book, but still somewhat disappointing. The premise of the story is as follows: Tim Carrier (the protagonist) is a loner who frequents a bar most evenings. One night, a case of mistaken identity leads him to discover that a woman (Linda Paquette) who he’s never met is the target of a hit or contract. He has a choice: Stay out of it, or help the poor girl. He decides to help her and before he knows it, they have fallen in love and the two …

moscow-rules

Moscow Rules

I am a big fan of thrillers, in particular if there is any serialization involved (a single character appearing in multiple novels – and there is a particular order in which the books should ideally be read). Some authors and their series thrillers that I enjoy are : Sue Grafton – The Kinsey Millhone Alphabet series Michael Connelly – The Hieronymus Bosch series John Sandford – The Prey series Patricia Cornwell – The Kay Scarpetta series (the first few novels only) Since, most of these series are coming close to an end (or more accurately I am reading them faster than the writer can produce them), I have been on the lookout for other such novels. One that I read recently is Moscow Rules by Daniel Silva. The protagonist is Gabriel Allon – an art restorer turned secret servant agent who works for the Israeli government. He is put in charge of tracking illegal arms sales to Al-Qaeda by a Russian arms dealer. The plot moves quickly and has a lot of action. However, some …