All posts tagged: Cornelia Funke

My First Tag of 2010

My reading efforts and my life in general has been pretty lacklustre of late. Nothing eventful to blog about. Couple of weeks back, the snubnose was down with pneumonia. In the ensuing worry, leave from office, and so on, I have had to do some massive catch-up with work, and it is not over yet. I have also had to slow down completely halt my reading of Bleak House. I stopped reading when the snubnose fell ill, and I have just not been motivated enough to pick it up (or even any other book) again. Strange for me! I must really be feeling the blues… Anyway, I saw this interesting meme on Mae’s blog, and I liked the questions enough to take part myself. So, without much ado, here we go: Favorite childhood book? If it was early childhood, I would agree with Mae and list The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton. By the time I was ten though, I was headlong in love with Robert Louis Stevenson … in particular Treasure Island and Black Arrow. …

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Dragon Rider

I am still hoping to somehow finish the Young Adult Reading Challenge I started last year. Towards that effort, I decided to try out Dragon Rider from Cornelia Funke. The book is a fantastical tale about a dragon whose environment is threatened due to human development on its land. So, the dragon (Firedrake), his friend Sorrel – the brownie, and a little boy embark on a journey to a legendary place called Rim of Heaven (a sort of Shangri-la) where silver dragons can live in peace for ever. With only a curious map and the whispered memories of an old dragon to guide them, they fly across moonlit lands and seas to reach the highest mountains in the world. Along the way, they must also defeat the villainous Golden One who is determined to kill all dragons. My thoughts on this Book I don’t know if I am reading too much into the book, and whether a child reading this book would get the message but I loved the concept of environment conservation that Cornelia …

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Inkdeath

This is the last of Cornelia Funke’s three books in her Ink trilogy. I have reviewed the first 2 books, here and here. Note:This review assumes you have already read the first two books in the series. This book starts off almost immediately where Inkspell ends. Farid, Dustfinger’s faithful friend is searching for a way to bring him back from the land of the dead. Mo, Reza, and Meggie are struggling to live in a world where the Adderhead is living an immortal life, but is still after Mo. Mo is becoming more and more like the Bluejay, the heroic character who has to save Inkworld from the Adderhead’s excesses, and undo the damage that he has done in Inkspell by making the Adderhead immortal. Orpheus is the greedy guz who is using his powers to write himself into a powerful life in Inkworld. Sounds like too many plot threads? well, Cornelia Funke juggles them all quite skilllfully, I must say. The book does start off slow (just like the rest of the books in …

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The Thief Lord

Two orphan boys, Bo and Proper, escape from their evil aunt to the city of Venice. In Venice, they come under the protection of the Thief Lord and his gang of orphan/delinquent children. They live in an abandoned cinema hall and depend on the Thief Lord for everything. Prosper and Bo’s evil aunt manages to track them to Venice and there they hire a private investigator to bring them back. They plan to adopt Bo, but leave Prosper in a boarding school. Meanwhile, the Thief Lord gets an opportunity to pull of a huge heist, the proceeds of which could once and for all take care of all the children’s needs and end their rather hand-to-mouth existence. However, the Thief Lord has his own secrets that almost tear apart the gang. The private detective is hot on Prosper and Bo’s tracks; and everything that could go wrong with the heist goes wrong. Can they all make their fortunes? What happens to these children? Are Bo and Prosper caught and delivered to their aunt? Well, you …

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Inkspell – A Book Review

Inkspell by Cornelia Funke is the second installment of the Young Adult Fantasy series of novels about Inkworld. While Inkheart deals with characters from Inkworld who have come into our world, the story of Inkspell actually takes place entirely in Inkworld. All the major characters of Inkheart – Mo, Meggie, Dustfinger, Farid, are sent back into Inkworld, where they have to fight to save themselves from the villainous Adderhead. The villains Basta and Mortola return to Inkworld as well and make life difficult for Mo and co. The book is an easy, though not quick read. It follows a similar pacing and narrative style to Inkheart. The book starts slowly, moves quickly through the middle, and then inexplicably (I really wanted a charged climax) slows down towards the end. There are some places where I found Inkspell superior to Inkheart: The characterizations of Meggie, Mo, and Resa are a bit more detailed – they were pretty much caricatures in Inkheart. Basta and Mortola remain as one-sided as before though. The action moving to Inkworld provides …

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Magyk

Of late, I have been really reading a lot of Fantasy novels, so while doing this review, I just could not help but compare this one to others that I have read. I know it is really unfair to compare novels written by different authors, but I just could not review this book in isolation. So, deep breath and here it goes… Magyk by Angie Sage is one of a series of Young Adult Fantasy novels. The entire series consists of the following books: Magyk Flyte Physik Queste Syren (unreleased) and there may be more to come, I guess. The Plot Septimus Heap (the hero of the series) is the seventh son of a seventh son, giving him extra-strong magical capabilities. On the day he is born, he is wrongly pronounced dead by the midwife and is sent to the evil Necromancer DomDaniel who wants to keep him and train him in his path of black magic. On the same day, his father walking back home finds a small girl child abandoned in the forest, …

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Inkheart

The success of the Harry Potter series seems to have created a spurt in the growth of Young Adult (YA) Fantasy literature. Numerous writers (some good and some not-so-good) have piggy-backed on this formula. And one of them is Cornelia Funke – author of the Ink series. The series consists of the following novels: Inkheart Inkspell Inkdeath The premise of the book is : The hero Mo can bring characters from a book to life when he reads a book out aloud. However, when he does bring someone out of a novel, something in the real world has to take its place in the book. When Mo’s daughter was three, he was reading to his wife from a rather rough fantasy book called Inkheart. Three grown men from the story appear while Mo’s wife, a futon, and a stuffed animal disappear from the living room. Mo goes into hiding, because the men he read out of the story are the very evil bad guys from the book, and he makes it his life’s work to …