Chills/Thrills/Spills

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

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If you are a regular reader of this blog, you would have come to know that I am on a bit of a John Le Carré kick right now. I finished The Tailor of Panama a couple of months back, then picked up The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. Unlike The Tailor of Panama, which was nice but bloated, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is short and really cold.

Teaser Tuesdays: The Spy who came in from the cold

Teaser Tuesdays: The Spy who came in from the cold

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I tried to read The Spy Who Came In From The Cold when I was a teenager and quickly dumped it. I was looking for action. It’s not that sort of story. Le Carré’s not that sort of espionage writer.

Instead this book is a complex, slow, unglamorous rendering of life in the espionage world in the post World War 2 era. There are no good guys and no bad guys. And in the end, no happy endings for anybody.

Mailbox Monday – End of March

Mailbox Monday – End of March

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Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia of To Be Continued.

It’s been a long time since I did a Mailbox Monday post. I get my book deliveries both at home and office, and collating everything in one place and taking a photo seems to be an impossible task (and I know I have no logical reason for it). However, in the last couple weeks or so, books have been really tumbling into the house, and the only way I can keep track of what’s come in, and what I plan to read and review is through this Mailbox Monday post.

So, without further ado, here are the books I received starting from left to right.

The Tailor of Panama

The Tailor of Panama

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Excuse me for the rather shabby shot of the book cover in my featured image. The thing is, when one so deeply invests in second-hand books, it’s very difficult to take a good shot of it – without having something else in the frame to prettify it up. In this case, my bag #booksandbags.

Anyway, enough rambling, and let’s get on with a short and concise review of the book, shall we? In this case, directly contrary to the style of the book – long and rambling.

Not that there’s anything wrong with long, rambly books. In fact, in the right mood, I rather adore them.

X by Sue Grafton

X by Sue Grafton

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There was a time when I avidly read and re-read Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone books.

For those not aware, here is a brief introduction to the series. Way back in 1982, Sue Grafton published A is for Alibi – the first of a series of alphabet mysteries featuring private eye Kinsey Millhone.

This book became a huge hit, and Grafton followed up this success with other books B is for Burglar, C is for Corpse, and so on. You get the drift. It’s now 2017, and I just finished reading the latest in this series X – published in 2015.

Sharp Objects

Sharp Objects

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I’ve read Gone Girl, so when I went into this book, I knew what to expect – seriously evil characters, and a dark, twisty plot.

I also knew that this was Gillian Flynn’s first book, and I went into it expecting some flaws, and blunt edges. In both areas, this book worked for me as expected.