Historical Fiction

Top five books of 2016

Top five books of 2016

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Here is a very, very late post on the five best books I read in 2016. This is a post I’ve been sitting on for the past couple of weeks. The reason being I wanted to make a top ten post (which is what I usually do). But 2016 was mainly a year of a lot of escapist reading, and while I enjoyed quite a few of them (Cassandra Clare, Robert Galbraith, a ton of Indian fiction), I didn’t really feel that they were that great enough to be on a top ten list.

And so, here’s a top five. But the books mentioned here, I loved, as in I really, really loved, and would read again in a heartbeat.

Mailbox Monday

Mailbox Monday

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Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia of To Be Continued.

It’s been a long time since I did a Mailbox Monday post. Sadly, I have not been accepting too many review copies of late. I’ve been enjoying my own reads, and accepting less review copies meant that I could focus more on reading the books I have long wanted to read, and also be able to read them at my pace without worrying about a blogging schedule.

But once in a while, a tempting enough book comes along my way, and then it’s a slippery slope to accepting a whole bunch of other books.

All the Light we Cannot see

All the Light we Cannot see

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I never wanted to read this book for the longest time. From all the descriptions and reviews I read online, it seemed like another The Book Thief – a book I loved, but I didn’t particularly want to read another book about children in World War 2.

I eventually caved in and got this book because all the reviews were just too glowing to ignore any longer.

Bring up the Bodies

Bring up the Bodies

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I am on a roll right here. Two Man Booker prize-winning novels in a row. That usually never happens. Usually award winning books are such powerful experiences, that I need to take a break to clean up my mind a bit.

But Bring up the Bodies hardly feels like a Booker prize winner. It’s fast-paced, taut, and has a very tense quality in it, which is very surprising for a historical novel.

And yes, the language is out of the mind beautiful. But Mantel is not an author in love with her writing. At no point does the wonderful writing overshadow the story.

And what a story it is!

A Brief History of Seven Killings

A Brief History of Seven Killings

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I’ve been a huge fan of the singer Bob Marley ever since I was a kid. I’m probably dating myself here, but my parents had a record player, and we used to listen to Bob Marley and the Wailers all the time.

I”ll admit though that I never actually dug deeper into his lyrics and background. I just learnt the lyrics and sang along to hits without realizing what it all meant.

So, it came as a bit of a surprise to me last year when I learnt that Bob Marley had almost been shot dead, and that there was a whole, hidden conspiracy behind that incident.

Teaser Tuesdays: A Brief History of Seven Killings

Teaser Tuesdays: A Brief History of Seven Killings

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I have been reading last year’s Man Booker award winner – A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James for the past couple of weeks. Let me tell ya, there is nothing brief about it.