Historical Fiction

Life Lately #1

Life Lately #1

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Of late, I have been feeling like my blogging has got a bit mechanical – a bunch of book reviews (usually done way after I have read the book), the occasional restaurant review, but I think the earlier personal note has started to go missing. Partly, because somewhere along the way I started doing book reviews for publishers and food posts for restaurants (meaning I have a deadline), and basically the blog has started feeling more business-like, than like a personal blog.

I can’t say I can go completely back to the old tone and content as i no longer feel like I am writing solely for friends and family. But I also don’t want the blog to exist merely as a database of places to go, and books to read. I don’t know how the new style will evolve but I plan to have a little more about my daily life and routines, things I am thinking, what the kids are doing/saying to me, and so on.

Let’s see how things evolve. Old readers, I hope you will like my going back to more of what made you read my blog read in the first place, newer readers, I hope you find reading about the person behind the blog as interesting as the blog itself.

Fingers crossed and hoping.

The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet

The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet

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This is the second Pride and Prejudice related fiction I’ve read recently (see my review of Death Comes to Pemberley here). Both these books came to me from the library, and I was very excited to read them. Unfortunately both have also turned out to be damp squibs.

Death Comes to Pemberley

Death Comes to Pemberley

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I never really got the idea of reading all the various sequels/adaptations of Pride and Prejudice. Don’t get me wrong, I love the classic, and have read it multiple times. But, I was quite happy leaving Darcy and Elizabeth where they belonged. I didn’t need to read more about them.

That is, until one day I stumbled across Death comes to Pemberley by P.D. James. The book synopsis did not sound utterly ridiculous (unlike say Pride and Prejudice and Zombies), and I’ve always enjoyed James’ mysteries.

Hence my decision to read this book.

Nefertiti

Nefertiti

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I am shamefully ignorant of the details of the Egyptian civilization. Sure, I know the names of a handful of Kings and Queens, but if questioned further would know next to nothing about any of their reigns, or even who is related to who. I mean, it’s so confusing. A lot of my confusion has to do with the fact that their names are so similar, and they tended to marry into the family, and because this is really ancient history, even the experts seem divided about how to interpret some of the archaeological artifacts.

So, when I picked up Nefertiti by Michelle Moran, it was with the full knowledge that anything she stated would fly by me. The only knowledge I had about Nefertiti was that she was an Egyptian queen, she was known for her beauty, and my mother has a bust of hers in her house from a trip to Egypt aeons ago.

The Tailor of Panama

The Tailor of Panama

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Excuse me for the rather shabby shot of the book cover in my featured image. The thing is, when one so deeply invests in second-hand books, it’s very difficult to take a good shot of it – without having something else in the frame to prettify it up. In this case, my bag #booksandbags.

Anyway, enough rambling, and let’s get on with a short and concise review of the book, shall we? In this case, directly contrary to the style of the book – long and rambling.

Not that there’s anything wrong with long, rambly books. In fact, in the right mood, I rather adore them.

This was a man

This was a man

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This was a man is the final book in The Clifton Chronicles, which is a series of seven novels by Jeffrey Archer.

These books loosely follows the life of Harry Clifton and his family and friends. This is a series that spans a lifetime from 1920 to the late 1980s.